Professor Keller's New Book

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Fordham Professor Eve Keller and University of Maryland Professor Kimberly Anne Coles have co-edited The Routledge Companion to Women, Sex, and Gender in the Early British Colonial World.

All of the essays in this volume capture the body in a particular attitude: in distress, vulnerability, pain, pleasure, labor, health, reproduction, or preparation for death. They attend to how the body’s transformations affect the social and political arrangements that surround it. And they show how apprehension of the body – in social and political terms – gives it shape.

Professor Keller is the author of Generating Bodies and Gendered Selves: The Rhetoric of Reproduction in Early-Modern England (University of Washington Press, 2007) and co-author of Two Rings (PublicAffairs, 2012), which has been published in seven languages. Past president of the Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts, she is currently President of the Fordham University Faculty Senate and Director of the Honors Program at Fordham College at Rose Hill.

Congratulations to Professor Keller. For more information on Women, Sex, and Gender in the Early British Colonial World, click here: Women, Sex, and Gender in Early British Colonial World.

Doctoral Student Danielle Sottosanti Attends Groundbreaking Symposium

English Department Doctoral student Danielle Sottosanti represented Fordham University at the first Race before Race symposium, an event designed for medieval and early modern race scholars.

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The two-day event, hosted by the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Arizona State University, featured scholars who are pushing their fields in new directions in the study of race, whether from archival, theoretical, or practical directions.

Speakers included Patricia Akhimie, David Sterling Brown, Seeta Chaganti, Urvashi Cahkravarty, Kim Hall, Jonathan Hsy, Dorothy Kim, Noémie Ndiaya, Shokoofeh Rajabzadeh, Carla Maria Thomas, Farah Karim-Cooper, and Cord Whitaker.

Sottosanti, whose Doctoral project explores the intersections of race, religion, and gender in the conversion narratives of medieval romance, enjoyed being a part of the symposium and supporting its more inclusive approaches to the study of race in the medieval and early modern world.

For more on the symposium, click here: Race before Race Symposium

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Fordham PhD Alum Celebrates Book Launch

Congratulations to Fordham Ph.D. recipient Dr. Michael Andindilile, now the Dean of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Dar es Salaam, who’s recent book launch received national recognition on iTV Tanzania.  

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As Dr. Andindilile explains it, his book, The Anglophone Literary-Linguistic Continuum, explores “the various uses of the English language on the African environment to represent various and diverse experiences on the continent.”

After the panel discussion and celebration at the University of Dar es Salaam, Dr. Andindilile expressed his joy and gratitude for the entire publishing process.  

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“I’m grateful to enter the world of publishing because I used to think it was mission impossible, but now it’s mission possible.” 

With the publication of the book, Dr. Andindilile looks to the future and the positive impact he can have on young writers in Tanzania. “I know I can inspire others, and since my book came out, so many people are coming to see me, and I’ve been encouraging them. Also, I know I can mentor some of them, so they can also end up publishing."

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Congratulations, once again, to Dr. Andindilile on this remarkable accomplishment. 

For more information about his book, click here:  https://goo.gl/oLtBJr

Writing Contest Opportunity for Fordham Students

An exciting opportunity for Fordham students, undergraduate and graduate, comes our way through The Suzanna Cohen Legacy Foundation (SCLF), an organization devoted to collecting and preserving narratives about forced displacement—past and present—of survivors, refugees, immigrants, and exiles, as well as individuals or groups who offered support and succor. 

This contest, offered for the first time, is open only to Fordham students, undergraduates or graduates in any of our programs or schools.  Four prizes, each of $750, are to be awarded to creative works in four categories: writing, performance, visual art, and mixed media. There is a possibility of eventual publication as well. Submission deadline is February 20th.

To submit, go here: Suzanna Cohen Legacy Foundation Prizes.

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SCLF is a nonprofit founded by the family of Edward Cohen, whose mother fled the Nazi invasion of Poland in 1939 and three years later came to Tehran, where she met and married her husband and lived for close to forty years. She was exiled for a second time because of the Iranian Revolution in the late 1970s.  

The foundation's particular association with Fordham came about thanks to Kim Dana Kupperman, a former writer-in-residence in the English Department who wrote a novel about the family's story, entitled  Six Thousand Miles to Home: A Novel Inspired by a True Story of World War II.  

Call For Submissions: 2019 Creative Writing Prizes

We are now accepting applications for the 2019 Creative Writing Prizes. Submissions will be accepted until February 20th. 

Click on the titles of prizes to access guidelines and the online submission manager. 

Academy of American Poets Prize
Eligibility: Any Fordham student
1 prize of $100

Bernice Kilduff White & John J. White Creative Writing Prize
Eligibility: Rose Hill senior undergraduate students
1 prize Cash Amount to be determined.

Margaret Lamb/Writing to the Right-Hand Margin Prizes
Eligibility: Any Fordham student
1 prize of $100

Suzanna Cohen Legacy Foundation Prizes
Eligibility: Any Fordham student
4 prizes of $750

The Reid Family Prize
Eligibility: Any Fordham student
1 prize of $500

Professor Bly's Book Named Best of 2018

Congratulations to Mary Bly (pen name Eloisa James), whose novel Too Wilde to Wed has been named one of the ten best books of 2018 by Apple Books.

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From Apple: “In 2018, Apple Books launched as a brand new app, making it effortless for iPhone and iPad users to discover and enjoy books and audiobooks. This year Apple Books celebrates works from a diverse group of authors,” including There There by Tommy Orange and American Marriage by Tayari Jones.

Too Wilde to Wed, a novel Booklist says marries “potent sensuality with a deliciously dry sense of humor,” also debuted at #7 on the New York Times best seller list and was picked as one of Amazon’s Best Books of the Month.

Congrats again to Professor Bly on this fabulous accomplishment.

5th Annual Golden Gloves Literary Competition & Fair

On December 7, the annual Golden Gloves Literary Competition and Fair took place at the Lincoln Center campus. Creative writing classes across Fordham presented their work to compete for three prizes: Ram d’Or (Best in Show), Best Experiment, and the Audience Award. This year, the presentations were judged by Gina Apostol, winner of the PEN Open Book Award for her novel Gun Dealer’s Daughter, and recipient of the Philippine National Book Award.

Before the event, attendants enjoyed a pizza dinner and had the opportunity to attend a campus Literary Fair, which featured the publications Bricolage, The Ampersand, The Comma, and MODE Magazine. Staff members in these groups fielded questions from students interested in writing for publication.

The competition itself featured ten different creative writing classes: Performance Criticism, Poetry - What Good is It?, Essay is a Verb, The Stuff of Fiction, Poetry of Witness, The Good Life, First Flint, Writing the World, Writing for Teens in an Adult World, and The Outsiders: Reading and Writing Fiction about Outsiders, Outcasts, Exiles, and Rebels.

Taylor Shaw, FCRH ‘19, appreciated the diversity of voices and topics represented by the classes.

“Everyone brought something different to the table this year, and I really liked that the pieces covered a broad variety of topics,” said Shaw. “From hilarious parodies of guilty pleasure young adult novels to hard-hitting and chilling reflections on the Kavanaugh trial and its surrounding context, the different works kept us engaged and at the edge of our seats for the entire competition.”

Judge, Gina Apostol read a selection from her new novel, Insurrecto. She was followed by Writer in Residence Nyssa Chow, who presented her multimedia story on a hunger striker in Trinidad, as well as scenes from her Still.Life. Exhibition.

As a student in Chow’s Multimedia and Narrative Practice class, Shaw was grateful for the opportunity to hear, see, and be inspired by her professor’s work.

“As her student, it was really gratifying to get to see her brilliant work after such a wonderful semester,” said Shaw. “We had such a great opportunity to see the skills we’d learned in action.”

The Ram d’Or (Best In Show) award was given to Professor Nyssa Chow’s Essay is a Verb class for their poignant commentary on sexual abuse and feminism after the Kavanaugh trial. Best Experiment went to the students of Professor Sarah Gambito’s The Good Life, for their interpretation of a dialogue with the succulent plants they had nurtured over the course of the semester. Finally, Molly Horan’s class, Writing for Teens in an Adult World, took home the Audience Award for its rollicking tribute to the young adult fiction genre.

Though saddened that this would be her last Golden Gloves, senior Evgenia Mantika, FCLC ‘19, expressed her appreciation of how the event brought the creative writing community together.

“Golden Gloves reminds creative writing students of the incredible community they are a part of,” said Mantikas. “It is a chance for us to be inspired by our peers, whether it be by expressing our voices politically or by writing brilliant young adult fiction.”