English Major wins Claire Hahn Becker Scholarship

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Congratulations to Fordham’s 2018 Claire Hahn Becker Scholarship recipient, Emily Gerace. The prize carries a $3000 award, which Emily will use to begin her graduate studies at the University of Toronto.

The Claire Hahn Becker Scholarship is awarded annually to an outstanding FCRH student who is interested in literature and who is going on to graduate study in English or a related field.

English Major Fulfills Her Dream

 A year ago, Cat Reynolds had a dream that she worked at Sesame Street, and recently she went in pursuit of that dream. A senior, majoring in English with a Creative Writing Concentration, Cat felt she was well-suited for the Sesame Street internship because she had a background in education (as a camp counselor for gifted children), in entertainment (producing her own CD in high school), and publishing (thanks to an internship at a literary agency). 

During her interview in late August, Cat told them about her dream. “They said, ‘That’s crazy!’ And then they hired me!”

This fall, Cat will work in the company’s Products and Publishing Department developing material for books, ebooks, apps, and social media. The internship is two full days a week, and the pay is better than New York’s $13 minimum wage. 

How was the first day? Cat Reynolds laughs. “I worked on an app for potty training.”  

Fordham PhD becomes Journal Editor

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Paul Thifault (PhD, Early American, 2012), who is an assistant professor at Springfield College, has recently been selected as Co-Editor of Resources for American Literary Study (Penn State University Press). Founded in 1971, RALS is a peer-reviewed journal of archival and bibliographical scholarship covering all periods of American literature. Under the new editorship of Thifault and Nancy Sweet (Cal State Sacramento), the journal will move from an annual to a biannual publication and expand its coverage to include the digital humanities and literary pedagogies.

“It’s an exciting time for archival and bibliographical research in American literature,” says Thifault, “as our very notions of the archive, the book, and what counts as ‘American literature’ are all in flux.” While featuring the work of early-career and senior scholars, RALS also welcomes graduate student submissions because, as Thifault notes, “the nature of orals-prep and proposal writing makes grad students aware of patterns and gaps in critical bibliography, not to mention that so many graduate students now spend fellowship time in the archives, digitally and physically.”

The journal’s “Prospects” essays, which forecast future developments in the scholarly study of major authors, are also an excellent resource for students in the process of devising thesis or dissertation topics.

For inquiries, send an email to ethifault@springfieldcollege.edu

For submissions, visit http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_rals.html

Or follow RALS on Twitter @ForLiterary

More fabulous job news, Ray Dademo at Monmouth University

In September, Ray Dademo, an English major and alum (FCLC’07), will begin a tenure-track position at Monmouth University, where he has taught composition as an adjunct for several years.  In 2012, Ray completed his MFA in Creative Writing (Nonfiction) at Columba University with a concentration on the principles of Composition and Rhetoric, one of his academic interests. 

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     Recently, at the Northeast Modern Language Association conference Ray presented “Progressive Pedagogy: Long-term Academic Competence from the Composition Class.”  An article Ray did for the CEA Critic entitled “Narrating the Moviegoing Experience: Reframing Film for First Year Composition,” led to a presentation with the same name at the College English Association meeting. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/678900

     Ray has also taught composition at Montclair State University and Rutgers University and plans to pursue a Ph.D.

Henna Messina, Fordham University English major, earns lecturer position in English at Clemson University

 Henna Messina, an English major who graduated from Fordham in 2006, and completed her Ph.D this year at the University of Georgia, has just started a job as a lecturer in English at Clemson University.    Below is what I copied and pasted from her grad. assistant page, still up, at Georgia.  Elizabeth Stone  "Henna is a sixth-year PhD candidate specializing in eighteenth and nineteenth-century British Literature. Her dissertation is titled "Dislocated Women: Disinheritance, Mobility and Domestic Space in British Fiction (1753-1855)" and explores the creation of a literary female subjectivity through the pressures of materiality and disinheritance in the novels of Frances Burney, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, and Elizabeth Gaskell.  Henna's article, "Fanny Price's Domestic Assemblages in Austen's  Mansfield Park ," has appeared in the journal  Persuasions.  Her article "Bodily Matters: Creative Agency in Frances Burney's Life Writing" is forthcoming in  Women's Writing.  She has recently presented on gift economy in  Mansfield Park  at the 2017 meeting of the  American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies  and domestic politics in Frances Burney's  Cecilia  at the 2016 meeting of the  Frances Burney Society .   Education:   BA in English, Fordham University, 2006  MA in British Literature, CUNY Hunter College, 2010

Henna Messina, an English major who graduated from Fordham in 2006, and completed her Ph.D this year at the University of Georgia, has just started a job as a lecturer in English at Clemson University.  

Below is what I copied and pasted from her grad. assistant page, still up, at Georgia.

Elizabeth Stone

"Henna is a sixth-year PhD candidate specializing in eighteenth and nineteenth-century British Literature. Her dissertation is titled "Dislocated Women: Disinheritance, Mobility and Domestic Space in British Fiction (1753-1855)" and explores the creation of a literary female subjectivity through the pressures of materiality and disinheritance in the novels of Frances Burney, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, and Elizabeth Gaskell.

Henna's article, "Fanny Price's Domestic Assemblages in Austen's Mansfield Park," has appeared in the journal Persuasions. Her article "Bodily Matters: Creative Agency in Frances Burney's Life Writing" is forthcoming in Women's Writing. She has recently presented on gift economy in Mansfield Park at the 2017 meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and domestic politics in Frances Burney's Cecilia at the 2016 meeting of the Frances Burney Society.

Education:

BA in English, Fordham University, 2006

MA in British Literature, CUNY Hunter College, 2010

Will Fenton named Creative Director of Major Grant

Doctoral candidate Will Fenton will serve as the creative director of a multi-year project “Redrawing History: Indigenous Perspectives on Colonial America,” supported by a $300,000 grant that was recently awarded to the Library Company of Philadelphia by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage. This project builds on Fenton’s recent fellowship at the Library Company where he conducted research and designed the digital humanities project Digital Paxton, which increases accessibility to and awareness of the 1764 Paxton pamphlet war.

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At the center of “Redrawing History” will be an educational graphic novel and public exhibition at the Library Company. Fenton has assembled an advisory board with leaders from the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the Lenape Center, the Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of the American Indian, and the McNeil Center for Early American Studies to support a Native American writer (Lee Francis), artist (Weshoyot Alvitre), and publisher (Native Realities Press) as they reinterpret the Paxton massacre of 1763 from the perspective of the Conestoga. The published book will be freely distributed to the public and to all 567 federally-recognized tribes. Graphic art will be made publicly accessible via Digital Paxton and the Digital Public Library of America.

 

Alongside the publication of the graphic novel, the project will feature a national educators’ summer institute co-sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, a tour and site visit at the Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of the American Indian, and a public exhibition and symposium at the Library Company of Philadelphia. All new curricular and archival resources will be made publicly accessible through Digital Paxton.

 

To learn more about the project, see The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage’s press release.