The Annual Mullarkey Research Forum named after generous donors to the English Department, provides a snapshot of faculty research across the disciplines of English Studies and Creative Writing.

Save the date and stay tuned for details on this year's Forum which will held on Wednesday, November 19th. 

 

Following is a snapshot of last year's Forum that featured six talks on a wide range of subjects. 

The event began with a generous introduction by the holder of the Thomas F. X. and Theresa Mullarkey Chair in Literature, Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, who was applauded for her efforts in organizing this event each year. Wogan-Browne argued eloquently that true innovation takes place in humanities research--not just in science--and the Forum proved her point.  

Jocelyn Wogan-Browne

Jocelyn Wogan-Browne

Edward Cahill

Edward Cahill

The first of the afternoon's two panels was introduced and chaired by Frank Boyle, and began with Edward Cahill's talk "Colonial Rising: Narratives of Upward Mobility in British America." Cahill's exhaustive research on these narratives is showing that much of what we think we understand about upward mobility is historically wrong: for instance, that what we call "the American dream" really originated in Britain. 

 

 

Daniel Contreras

Daniel Contreras

 

Next up was  Daniel Contreras, who spoke about his project “Falling in Love with Love: Latino Literary Studies and the History of Love.” Contreras argued for the cultural specificity of even the most basic forms of emotion, such as love, and drew on Sandra Cisneros's novel Caramelo to illustrate his point.  

 

 

Sarah Gamibto

Sarah Gamibto

Sarah Gambito's “Second Born:  Writing Race and Belonging" concluded the first panel.  Gambito, poet and Creative Writing Director, linked her poetry with her work on the nonprofit group Kundiman, and shared the video recently created for the organization as well as a video of one of its recent projects. 

 

 

The second panel, chaired by Eve Keller, opened with Susan Greenfield speaking about her op-ed writing on the Huffington Post. Her talk was titled “Vlog and Blog: The Lizzie Bennet Diaries and Public Exposure." Next came two faculty members who are working on the history and theory of Method Acting, and are planning a major conference on the topic for Fall 2014 at Fordham's Lincoln Center campus. First Shonni Enelow gave a talk titled “Identifying the Method,” which touched on several examples of how Method Acting has figured in popular culture, including at the 2013 White House Correspondents' Dinner. Then Keri Walsh's talk, “Acting Like a Hustler: The Films of Paul Newman," centered on a reading of a scene from the 1961 film 

The Hustler, featuring Paul Newman and Piper Laurie. 

From left to right, Keri Walsh, Shonni Enelow and Susan Greenfield

From left to right, Keri Walsh, Shonni Enelow and Susan Greenfield

Each panel resulted in lively discussion with the audience and everyone enjoyed the festive reception in between. Audience members and participants alike agreed that--as with the previous two Mullarkey events--the forum highlighted the strength, depth, and breadth of faculty research in Fordham University's English Department. 

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AuthorMartine Stern

We are pleased to announce the publication of the Spring 2014 issue of Rhētorikós: Excellence in student writing, containing ten outstanding essays produced in Spring 2014 by first-year students at Fordham’s Rose Hill campus.  These essays were chosen from a record number of submissions through a blind-review process.  This process involves composition teachers and writing center tutors as judges who provide comments that help the writers improve accepted essays in one more revision prior to publication.

Rhētorikós gives undergraduate students the experience and prestige of publishing at an early stage in their academic careers. Their professors likewise benefit from the experience of mentoring students through a vigorous revision process of an important piece of work. Students and teachers alike are justly proud of the results, as are co-editors Tara C. Foley and Christy L. Pottroff as well as faculty advisor Moshe Gold. 

Please visit rhetorikos.org to read the newest essays, which include personal narratives, researched arguments, and thoughtful responses on the following wide range of topics: the prevention of sexual assault on college campusesthe abuse of performance-enhancing drugs; the storied histories of two New York City landmarks, Bryant Park and Grand Central Stationlife as a commuterinequity in public educationthe Motion Picture Association’s ratings system; organic farming; and a personal totem. In addition, we are pleased to announce the first-ever multi-media project chosen for Rhētorikós, an investigation into the booming coffee industry. Looking forward, we hope to publish more innovative student work that combines written expression and new media.

We hope you enjoy the issue!

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AuthorGlenn Hendler

This summer, I briefly got the chance to feel like a student again. I went to England to pick up a Master’s degree that I completed over a decade ago at Oxford (Oxford degree ceremonies are strange things;

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AuthorGlenn Hendler

According to the New York Times, English Department Chair Glenn Hendler is one of the foremost experts on men crying in public. How he came to be an “expert” in this subject has everything to do with how our culture interprets “expertise”—what counts and what doesn’t, how we signal it, and the scenarios in which it does or does not get questioned. Expertise goes to the heart of the cultural status of the public intellectual, and conflicting definitions of expertise help determine who we turn to when we need help thinking about a significant public event or issue.

Professor Hendler's essay "On Expertise and the Public Intellectual" is part of a series entitled "Public Intellectuals" that is being run by Avidly, a Los Angeles Review of Books Channel.

 

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AuthorGlenn Hendler